Curriculum Blog Series – “Want To Know How To Recognize The Genius In Your Genius?” 5 Traits To Look For

courtesy of google apps genius kids games

courtesy of google apps
genius kids games

This is Awesome! Thanks Dr. Joy!
Families, are you registered to hear Dr. Joy Lawson Davis discuss social and emotional issues facing advanced learning kids of color at elite institutions? She’s only in town one day, Saturday, 2/22 10:00-11:30 am at the IDEAL School of  Manhattan. Don’t miss her. Read all about it and Register here

By Joy Lawson Davis, Ed.D.

 

In the past six months, an increased interest in gifted students and their education has been evidenced by news article, blogs and other media conversations. Contrary to popular belief, nurturing and educating high ability/gifted/genius children is a complex task. A century of research including specific case studies of gifted children from all backgrounds has provided a set of traits that can help parents, educators, and other advocates recognize the ‘genius’ in our genius children.

The list below, while not exhaustive, provides some of these traits (Davis, 2010, pgs. 11&12):

1-    Verbally precocious: The gifted child who is verbally precocious usually talks early and a great deal. OR when they do begin talking, their conversation, word choices, sentences, stories make up for lost time. They love using ‘big words’ and creating elaborate stories, dramatizations. Most of the time, these children are avid readers

2-    Reasons well: gifted children are generally the ones who probe deeper, go beyond the surface to discover new information. They make connections more easily than their ages peers. They enjoy problem solving (word, number or circumstances); their ability to make connections enables them to do well in science and technology related coursework.

3-    Rapidly learns new information: Most highly gifted children learn new information and concepts taught in science, mathematics, very easily and retain the information without many repetitions. These students will need opportunities to move more quickly through content materials and to take advanced courses earlier than others. It is not unusual for gifted mathematics students (boys and girls) to complete Algebra I as early as grade 6 (or elementary school) and take 2-3 years of AP math or science coursework prior to completion of high school.

4-    Unusually sensitive to the needs of others: Gifted individuals are highly sensitive and deeply concerned about social justice, morality, equity. They are generally the student who will come to the defense of others who may be treated unfairly by peers or adults in the environment. They will become leaders early and take up causes to help those less fortunate than themselves more frequently.

5-    Imaginative & creative: Many gifted children have imaginary friends when they are young. These ‘friends’ share their world and allow them to create spaces and stories to experience that others may not share. Many excel in the arts where they have numerous opportunities to demonstrate their creativity. Imagination and creativity are also essential skills for future inventors, problem solvers, engineers.

Recent articles of interest discussing the needs of gifted learners in general and in the STEM areas:

Math & Science http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/15/opinion/sunday/in-math-and-science-the-best-fend-for-themselves.html?_r=1&

STEM & Girls http://www.huffingtonpost.com/techbridge-girls/lean-in-help-a-girl-change-the-world_b_2958083.html

STEM in Schools http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2014/01/10-innovative-ways-to-bring-stem-to-schools/

FREE Online http://www.buzzfeed.com/summeranne/24-invaluable-skills-to-learn-for-free-online-this-year

NASA Summer Program http://www.uah.edu/cspar/research/re

HEROES Program for Gifted Jan 18-20, Rutgers Univ (NJ) http://njgifted.org/?ad=45&utm_source=HEROES+Conference+for+Gifted+Teens+this+weekend&utm_campaign=CC+-+Annual+Conference+-++Jan+13&utm_medium=email

For more reading about traits and how to nurture gifted children, see:

Davis, J.L. (2010). Bright, Talented & Black: A guide for Families of African Americ an Gifted Learners. Great Potential Press. Scottsdale:AZ.

Register here…to see Dr. Joy Lawson Davis at IDEAL School of Manhattan 2/22

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One Comment

  1. Gina Parker Collins
    Posted February 27, 2014 at 4:42 pm | Permalink

    SCHOLARLY MOTHER LOVE!

    WHEN WE ASKED WHAT TWO THINGS RESONATED FROM TIME WITH DR. JOY LAST WEEKEND, THIS IS WHAT WE GOT…

    “SO MANY THINGS, THE TRIPLE QUANDARY (THE BREAKDOWN OF AN OBVIOUS PROBLEM) THE REFERENCE TO THE BOOK” RUEBEN “AND HOW OUR CHILDREN ARE CARRYING THEIR COMMUNITIES ON THEIR BACK! WHAT IGNITED/INSPIRED ME THE MOST WAS DR. JOY LAWSON DAVIS’ SOLUTION TO THESE PROBLEMS. HER PLAN TO EDUCATE AND EMPOWER THE PARENTS, SHE SPOKE ABOUT A TRAINING.
    “IF IT TAKES A VILLAGE, BUILD ONE” – MALAAK ROCK
    I LOVE DR. JOY LAWSON DAVIS!”

    ASALI UDE, INDEPENDENT SCHOOL PARENT ATTENDEE

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